Doctors Fall, Too

Today I had a doctor appointment. We did labs and luckily, everything is good.

I told her about my recent attempt to get back into running– and tripping! She had a good laugh about the little demon dogs. I told her how hard it is to start over after being gone almost 10 months from regular runs or racing.

That I have anxiety about falling again. That I feel like I’ve forgotten how.

And she did the most awesome thing. She pulled up the sleeves on her lab coat to show off her own battle scars– especially her elbows.

“They didn’t really heal,” she said with a smile. Next she showed me the knee scars, with pride!

This woman is a full-on M.D. at one of the best hospitals in the country. She’s petite and fit and has glorious natural long hair. She’s the kind of woman I see and think, “Wow.”

And she was telling me that she, too, falls down running.

The difference between us is that she doesn’t let her falls define or scare her.

She gets back out there. She accepts those clumsy moments.

And she knows that falling is part progress. As long as you don’t stop.

My sleeping has been off, and running used to help regulate it.

I can do this.

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The Longest Week: Rest, Ice, Recovery

I’m not seriously injured!

Rather, it’s a good old-fashioned knee sprain.

I’m recovering well! The most difficult part is not putting on my running shoes.

It’s been six days since my last run.

I made it to Quick Care Sunday morning when it opened at 9 a.m. I was second in line at the door. They even did x-rays! I wasn’t expecting that, but it made me feel like they were being very official. ┬áLucky for me, my primary doctor was working. Because I stopped running activity, iced and elevated it immediately, he said I was in good condition.

He told me I need a week’s rest from running. And that no, I couldn’t do that 5k next week.

My Dad told me he didn’t think it was necessary to actually go to the doctor. But thank goodness I made my own decision. I am flabbergasted by people who for some reason are proud of never visiting a doctor. No matter how bad they feel, they will do everything to avoid it. They pride themselves on just working through it– but really, it’s just a heavy case of denial. And then they end up worse-off because by the time they are forced into medical attention, the problem is really bad. And that costs considerably more money, and maybe time off work.

Specifically, I wanted my doctor to set limits for me. To tell me what’s reasonable to expect and what’s not wise. I’m proud that I addressed it right away and followed protocol. I haven’t needed to miss any work, and I’m fine.

The night before I made it to Quick Care, I was so worried I couldn’t sleep.

Now that anxiety is gone and I can just resume my life.

When you face things, you can solve them and move past them.

I accept that my body has limitations. I respect and trust the judgment of my doctor.

I’m shocked how much I miss my runs already! I’m counting the days.

I told Eleise, my running partner, that I’m out of commission this week. She was bummed but understanding.

I’m going to wait a full week, just to be safe. I’ll get to a 5k later, after a bit more training.

I feel no pain. I haven’t used a wrap on my knee since yesterday and feel I’ll be okay without it. Icing it helps the most.

I’m going to start from scratch when I resume activity next Monday night. Back to 1 mile, then working up.

Just glad I didn’t ignore the pain and keep going.

Sometimes ya just gotta slow down and go back to start!